"Mirror, mirror, tell me..."

This is the eye-catching email subject that hooked me this morning, as I opened my mailbox. The sender is Caravane, a home design shop in Paris that I truly love.

So the surprise is not that I would be interested in what they sell. The surprise is that I would take the time to read what they have to say... on a Friday morning, when I have a million things to do, including to write my own newsletter. 

Love-match your photos and texts

As you'll notice, the content is rather classic - although better executed than most classic newsletters. I really like the balance between the photos and the text:

  • First, a big photo to display the objects in an appealing context.

  • Then, a small poetic text, in line with the fairy tale reference of the title:

"Brass or steel, with a patina or rough aspect, the marriage of mirror and metal is a promise of elegance.
Simply rectangular or solar, its majesty brings character to a room.
More audacious and always spectacular, when multiplied, a wall of mirrors is like an echo of light.
With mirrors, everything is possible.

  • Finally, smaller pictures of the objects in details to choose the ones you prefer (note: I have cropped the end of the email that made a final focus on one specific mirror).

Try something different

But to be honest, what really caught my attention and made me want to use this as a good example of marketing email is the idea they had to recreate the menu of their website in the header of the email (I haven't seen this trick often, have you?).

What I find pretty smart is that it doesn't give you the impression that someone wants you to visit the e-shop. It feels like you're already in there.

See below how the website gives you a totally consistent experience with the newsletter.

 http://caravane.fr/en/

http://caravane.fr/en/

I shall try something like that in my next Storytelling Digest!

I'll also share another good example of email marketing from a B2B company to provide food for thought for those of you who don't sell mirrors. 

 

Comment